How much is the bond to fund the renovation?

It will be a $14 million 25 to 30-year bond to fund this significant renovation project, which will improve and preserve our library building.

 

The addition looks like it is made out of cinder block, is it?

No!

The addition is designed with a stone facade to echo the quoins (masonry blocks at the corner of walls) on the building.  It’s difficult to show the variegated surface on the architect’s rendering, but here are the quoins that the new facade will reflect.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who is the architect and construction company for the project?

The library’s architects are Butler Rowland Mays Architects. We have been working with Butler Rowland Mays for nearly a decade to develop the renovation master plan. BRM were our partners in the renovation of our Children’s and Teen rooms as well as the upgraded perimeter fence, the outdoor amphitheater and rehabilitated garden spaces. Some of their more high profile projects are winners of the New York Library Association’s Building of the Year Award–Saugerties Public Library in 2012, Cairo Public Library in 2013, Moffat Library in 2018, and Highland Public Library in 2019–as well as Gloversville Public Library that was awarded a 2021 New York State Historic Preservation Award for Excellence in Historic Rehabilitation. The primary members of the BRM team working with Kingston Library are Paul Mays and Lisa Hayes.

Our construction managers are Calgi Construction Company, Inc.

What will be the tax consequence for homeowners? Are you seeking other sources of funding for this project?

The bond will increase taxes by 45 cents per $1,000 of assessed home value. The average Kingston homeowner will pay an additional $6.71 a month in taxes (based on an average assessed home value of $179,000). The library is seeking additional funding through government and foundation grants, as well as individual donations.

 

Why do you need the renovation now?

It is time to take care of the upgrades to the HVAC systems to avoid further repair costs which have been steadily increasing. It is most cost-effective to update the interior of the building and add the new elevator at the same time that we are replacing the heating, ventilation, air conditioning and other major mechanical systems inside the building.

 

Why weren’t these issues addressed years ago?

The Library Board of Trustees is careful about spending public money and has been diligent in thoroughly investigating the building’s condition. Extensive testing was performed by trusted engineers and architects with the expertise to determine what was essential in order to maintain and preserve our community’s investment in the library building. This ensures the work will be completed in the most responsible way possible.

 

If the most important upgrades are to the heating and cooling systems, why don’t we just do that?

We’ll need to close the building to replace the HVAC systems. We determined it would be most efficient and cost-effective to renovate the building while we upgrade the HVAC.

 

Wouldn’t the money being spent on this be better spent to build a brand-new library?

The current library building is centrally located in Midtown. We want to protect and preserve this historically significant building. Constructing a new library building this size would cost significantly more than $14 million.

 

Will the building be closed during the renovation project?

Yes, we expect the building will be closed for about 18 months. We intend to complete the renovation as quickly as possible, with the least disruption to patrons.
During construction, the library will move to a temporary location. We are considering several buildings in Midtown Kingston. We’ll let you know as soon as we make a decision. We will continue to provide the same level of services and access.

 

Can you describe the ways the library serves our community?

Today’s Kingston Library is more than just a place for books. It’s a public space designed to foster connections, while keeping pace with technology and community needs. The renovation and design improvements will help us to do that. We invite you to stop in to see how many people use the library every day. Educational and cultural programs, technology assistance, book groups, teen activities, and space for quiet study are just some of the ways the library serves patrons of all ages and abilities. The mission of the Kingston Library is to be a vital center in our diverse community that inspires lifelong learning and empowers our citizens by providing free and equal access to information, ideas, books, and technology.

 

What new services will this renovation allow the library to offer the community?

The newly renovated library will offer more space for people to work and a large community meeting room that will be accessible even after library hours. We envision new welcoming spaces that bring together the best of the physical and the digital.

 

Can we see the plans for this capital project? Will you be hosting public information sessions, either virtually or onsite?

The plans for the renovation are on display in the lobby of the library and on the library’s website.
We are hosting several information sessions and posting a video recording of the sessions online if you are unable to attend in person.

 

How do I vote?

All Kingston residents will have the opportunity to vote Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022, 10am–8pm at the Kingston Library, 55 Franklin St.

 

How do I vote by absentee ballot?

Pick up an absentee ballot at the library after Sept 1 and return it to the Library by 8pm Sept. 20.

 

Where can I learn more about the project?

Attend Info Sessions:
– Saturday, Aug, 6 • 10am – 12pm
– Wednesday, Aug 24 • 6 – 8pm
– Thursday, Sept 8 • 6 – 8pm

 

Visit the Library

55 Franklin St.

 

Who can I speak to if I have more questions about the bond?

Please email the library at vote@kingstonlibrary.com with any additional questions.

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